The continuing education courses listed under this category are presented in collaboration with Minnesota State University, Mankato and the School Social Work Association of America (SSWAA).  All books published by Oxford University Press.

Mounting evidence shows that zero-tolerance policies, suspensions, and restrictive security policies fail to improve school safety and student behaviors, and are linked with increased risk of dropping out. Minority students are suspended at disproportionate rates, and over a million cases of corporal punishment are reported each year. Against this dismal backdrop, David Dupper presents a transformative new model of school discipline that is preventive, proactive, and relationship-based. Unlike traditional punitive and exclusionary practices, the model developed in this Workshop volume focuses on enhancing students' connection to school through building relationships and bolstering social skills.  This highly practical guide catalogs an array of proven and promising practices designed to engage, instead of exclude, students. The book guides practitioners and administrators in identifying their school's unique needs and selecting appropriate strategies for use at the universal, targeted, and remedial levels. A five-step strategic planning model helps schools transition toward a holistic, relationship-based approach to discipline. 

At a rate of 25 pages per hour, this text takes approximately 3 hours to read and therefore is worth 3 Continuing Education Hours. The posttest is comprised of 3 questions per chapter, 15 questions total. 

When young children are showing signs of difficulty, parents, childcare providers, and teachers often approach practitioners for guidance on how to best support healthy development. Whether providing consultation in early education programs and elementary schools, or assisting children and families in clinics or private practice, these practitioners need a sophisticated understanding of early childhood issues combined with a down-to-earth approach to intervention. This practical yet comprehensive guide:

  • Reviews the multi-disciplinary knowledge needed to understand children's social, emotional, and behavioral difficulties
  • Outlines step-by-step approaches to intervention for a a wide range of issues
  • Zeros in on common problems in establishing relationships, communicating effectively, sustaining attention, and handling frustration and anxiety
  • Offers accessible ways to describe principles and strategies to parents and teachers
  • Illustrates the consultative process through richly detailed and engaging case material

At a rate of 25 pages per hour, this text takes approximately 12 hours to read and therefore is worth 12 Continuing Education Hours. The posttest is comprised of up to 3 questions per chapter and should be completed after reading the book.

Ethical predicaments are endemic for mental health professionals working in a host setting like schools. New interventions, evolving technologies, and a patchwork of ethical guidelines and legal codes create a constant stream of new ethical dilemmas. Quick answers and simple solutions are rare, but with the seven-stage model presented here, readers will learn to apply an ethical decision-making process that minimizes their liability while better protecting their students.

Beginning with an introduction to the moral, legal, and clinical foundations that undergird ethical practice, the authors outline an ethical decision-making process to handle conundrums that includes seven major steps: know yourself, analyze the dilemma, seek consultation, identify courses of action, manage the clinical concerns, enact the decision, and reflect on the process. Each chapter describes these steps in detail, provides case examples to illustrate their application, and presents exercises that encourage readers to integrate them into their everyday practice.

At a rate of 25 pages per hour, this text takes approximately 8 hours to read and therefore is worth 8 Continuing Education Hours. The posttest is comprised of approximately 3 questions per chapter and should be completed after reading the book.

Though recent legislation embedded with the No Child Left Behind Act and the Individuals with Disabilities Improvement Act mandates the use of evidence in school-based practice to demonstrate positive outcomes for all students, school social workers - especially those long out of school - often lack the conceptual tools to locate, evaluate, and apply evidence in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of their work. The first of its kind tailored specifically to this audience, this SSAAA Workshop title guides school professionals in infusing research throughout their daily practice. It shows school service providers a pragmatic approach to informing every major practice decision with the appropriate research so that students receive the best possible services. This includes how to use research to make reliable and valid assessments, how to use research to choose the best intervention, and how to do research to evaluate progress. Raines goes beyond creating a catalog of interventions that will soon be outdated and provides school social workers with a detailed road map of the EBP process. Chapters detail the nuts and bolts of EBP, explaining how to ask a relevant, answerable question; where to search for evidence; how to appraise the literature and avoid the pitfalls of web based information; how to adapt and apply the evidence in a developmentally and culturally sensitive way; and how to evaluate the results.

At a rate of 25 pages per hour, this text takes approximately 12 hours to read and therefore is worth 12 Continuing Education Hours. The posttest is comprised of approximately 3 questions per chapter and should be completed after reading the book.

 

This book is a practical guide to addressing school refusal behavior in children.  The book guides readers through the descriptions, assessment, resolution, and future prevention of school refusal behavior.  Various evidence-based strategies are presented which address the specific needs of the child based on age and reason for refusal. 

At a rate of 25 pages per hour, this text takes approximately 5 hours to read and therefore is worth 5 Continuing Education Hours.  The posttest is comprised of 21 questions and should be completed after reading the book. 

Response to Intervention (RtI) is at the heart of evidence-based practice in schools. Though written into federal special education legislation, it is a general education process consisting of a three-tiered framework for organizing a comprehensive and differentiated system designed to ensure educational success for all students.

The focus in this book is on meeting the social, emotional, and behavioral needs of students. School social workers are key stakeholders who need to be skilled in designing, monitoring, and evaluating the effectiveness of school-wide universal supports, targeted group interventions, and intensive individual interventions in objective and measurable terms.

Designed as both a training manual and a practical reference, this one-of-a-kind guide operationalizes this crucial service delivery framework. It highlights the importance of data-based decision making and offers concrete guidelines for collecting, analyzing, and displaying data. 


At a rate of 25 pages per hour, this text takes approximately 12 hours to read and therefore is worth 12 Continuing Education Hours. The posttest is comprised of up to 3 questions per chapter, 45 questions total and should be competed after reading the book.

 

Since its creation in the 1980s, solution-focused brief therapy (SFBT) has gradually become a common and accepted treatment option for many mental health professionals. With its emphasis on client strengths and short-term treatment, SFBT is well suited to school contexts, given the wide array of problems and the large caseloads of most school-based practitioners. This book will give school social workers the tools they need to understand and use SFBT with students, families, teachers, and administrators. Careful not to overstate results from a recent meta-analysis, the authors show where SFBT has been shown to be effective, especially with families and for classroom behavior problems, and how school professionals can incorporate its principles into their daily practice. Case examples describe in detail how school professionals have used SFBT with a group of students with text anxiety; to create a family health and employment fair in an under resourced school; with grandparents raising their grandchildren; and by coaching teachers to identify and solve classroom behavior issues with their students.

At a rate of 25 pages per hour, this text takes approximately 5 hours to read and therefore is worth 5 Continuing Education Hours.  The posttest is comprised of approximately 3 questions per chapter and should be competed after reading the book.

School social work enters its second century as a profession still conflicted about its central mission. Are school social workers meant to be "in-house" clinicians providing services to kids in need, or are they meant to be involved in program development to enhance the social and emotional learning of all students in a school? How much time should they devote to serving whole families, or consulting with teachers? Whatever school social workers claim to do in their schools, it's clear that they are going to have to prove that they are effective doing it. The demands of federal legislation like No Child Left Behind and state requirements for certification are making it increasingly necessary that school social workers demonstrate that they are highly qualified school-based mental health and social service professionals who can demonstrate outcomes that impact school "bottom line" issues like student achievement, attendance, and behavior. Rather than recoil from this pressure, school social workers can utilize the skills of evidence based practice (EBP) to help them enhance both their effectiveness and their knowledge of interventions that work to help students, teachers, parents, and staff in school contexts. This book demonstrates how EBP can be integrated into a  school social worker's daily practice, advancing the debate about where social workers can and should intervene, and how to do so effectively.

At a rate of 25 pages per hour, this text takes approximately 5 hours to read and therefore is worth 5 Continuing Education Hours. The posttest is comprised of approximately 3 questions per chapter or up to 24 questions and should be taken after reading the book.

 

Research has shown that truancy is frequently associated with juvenile crime and dropping out of school altogether. With the high dropout rate in the U.S. and the No Child Left Behind Act holding schools accountable for their dropout rates, it is essential for school social workers to contribute to their schools' improvement plan in meeting annual yearly progress benchmarks. This book covers best practices in truancy at the community, school, and student/family levels of interventions. It provides an essential everyday reference guide to research-based programs and truancy program implementation.

Beginning with an introduction to the essentials of truancy, its causes and consequences, and state and federal legislation, the authors then give readers a snapshot of what research has shown to work so far and what adaptations might look like in various school settings. Richly detailed case examples illustrate multiple levels of intervention, from the school-wide prevention and general policy levels to remedial interventions, including culturally competent approaches. Eminently practical and easily accessible, with sample forms, methods of measuring outcomes, ideas for funding, take-away points, and digestible research summaries, this will be a trusted toolkit for school professionals seeking to reduce their schools' dropout rates and improve students' engagement with school.

At a rate of 25 pages per hour, this text takes approximately 6 hour to read and therefore is worth 6 Continuing Education Hours.  The posttest is comprised of 20 questions and should be completed after reading the book.